Three reasons why Bradshaw is still the greatest Super Bowl quarterback

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Three reasons why Bradshaw is still the greatest Super Bowl quarterback

Post by fiboploc on Wed Feb 04, 2015 10:37 am

Terry Bradshaw went 4-0 in Super Bowls. Montana went 4-0 as well. While Brady gets props for winning four, two losses to the G-Men disqualifies the Pats passer. Who was better between Cool Joe and the Blonde Bomber? Here's three reasons that make Bradshaw's case as the best Super Bowl quarterback.


Come Super Bowl time, the "S" on Terry Bradshaw's sideline cap essentially stood for Superman.

The same could be said for former 49ers quarterback Joe Montana, who matched Bradshaw's record of 4-0 in Super Bowl competition a decade after Bradshaw's final Super Bowl win with the Steelers.

For whatever the reason, many Super Bowl "experts" dismiss Bradsahw's Super Bowl performances in favor of Montana's efforts in his Super Bowl triumphs. While Montana was certainly a standout performer on the game's biggest stage, one could make a very strong argument that Bradshaw is still the best Super Bowl quarterback ever.

Here's three reasons that argue Bradshaw's case:

1) Bradshaw faced tougher defenses: The Blonde Bomber faced and defeated Minnesota's famed Purple People Eaters in Super Bowl IX, the Steelers first of four Super Bowl victories in six years. He then defeated the Cowboys' downright scary Doomsday Defense twice, the first time in Super Bowl X and again three years later in Super Bowl XIII. A year after thrashing the Broncos to the tune of 35 passing yards and four interceptions in Super Bowl XII, Dallas was carved up by Bradshaw, who threw for a then-Super Bowl record 318 passing yards to go with four touchdown passes to win the game's MVP. In his final Super Bowl win, Bradshaw threw for 309 yards and two touchdowns against a Rams defense that had allowed just 19 points in its two playoff games prior to Super Bowl XIV.

While the Bengals' defenses of 1981 and '88 were tough, they were nothing like the defenses Bradshaw faced in his four Super Bowl wins. And the 1984 Dolphins defense that Montana carved up in Super Bowl XIX? They allowed 28 points two weeks earlier to a Steelers defense quarterbacked by the immortal Mark Malone. Finally, Montana's 297-yard, five touchdown performance in Super Bowl XXIV was against a dreadful Broncos defense that had allowed 39 and 42 points respectively in their previous two Super Bowls (Super Bowls XXI and XXII).

2) Montana had more help on offense: Bradshaw's running games were downright awful save a few plays in his final three Super Bowl wins. The Steelers averaged just 3.2 yards per carry in Super Bowl X, 2.8 yards a rush in Super Bowl XIII and a futile 2.3 yards a carry in Super Bowl XIV. The 49ers averaged 5.3 and 4.1 yards per rush against the Dolphins and Bengals in Super Bowls XIX and XXIII, and even though their average slipped to 3.3 yards in Super Bowl XXIV, Roger Craig and Tom Rathman combined to rush for a respectable 107 yards on 31 carries with three touchdowns in that game. Simply put, the opposing defenses took away Bradshaw's running games in three of his four Super Bowls. There was less help and more pressure on Bradshaw, especially late in the Super Bowl games, to deliver for his team, and each time, Bradshaw delivered.

1) Bradshaw dominated fourth quarters: Montana threw a total of 22 passes in the fourth quarter in his four Super Bowl victories. Take away his masterful 11-of-14, two touchdown fourth quarter performance in Super Bowl XXIII, Montana threw just six passes with zero touchdowns in the fourth quarter of Super Bowls, with just one pass having any significance in the game (a 22-yard completion in Super Bowl XVI led to the final three points in the 49ers 26-21 win over Cincinnati). Bradshaw, meanwhile, engineered eight fourth quarter scoring drives in Super Bowl competition that included four game-winning touchdown passes.

Pittsburgh trailed in Super Bowls X and XIV heading into the fourth quarter, in which Bradshaw led five total scoring drives in those games to secure Steelers victories. Bradshaw threw a 61-yard touchdown bomb to Lynn Swann to win Super Bowl X and a 73-yard scoring strike to John Stallworth to put Pittsburgh ahead to stay in Super Bowl XIV. Up 28-17 and looking for the knockout, Bradshaw found Swann for an 18-yard touchdown pass to secure the Steelers' win over Dallas in Super Bowl XIII.

To further strengthen Bradshaw's case is the fact that Montana enjoyed the comfort of Bill Walsh's West Coast Offense that was predicated on short, precise, high-percentage pass plays that resulted in Montana's longest Super Bowl pass being just 44 yards. Bradshaw, on the other hand, took his changes (and succeed) by throwing deep into the heart of the defenses in his final three Super Bowl wins. Bradshaw completed four passes that were caught 40 yards past the line of scrimmage in those games, which excludes Stallworth's 75-yard touchdown in the second quarter of Super Bowl XIII that was caught about 12 yards past the line of scrimmage.

While Montana was pure magic while directing the eight-play, 92-yard game-winning drive in Super Bowl XXIII that culminated in his 10-yard, game-winning touchdown pass to John Taylor with 34 seconds remaining, Bradshaw was (and needed to be) masterful in all four of his Super Bowl games in the fourth quarters, which is the most compelling reason why he still remains the best Super Bowl quarterback.

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until another QB wins more Super Bowls in 6 years Bradshaw is the best.

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Re: Three reasons why Bradshaw is still the greatest Super Bowl quarterback

Post by diehardsteersfan on Wed Mar 04, 2015 7:54 pm

fiboploc wrote:Terry Bradshaw went 4-0 in Super Bowls. Montana went 4-0 as well. While Brady gets props for winning four, two losses to the G-Men disqualifies the Pats passer. Who was better between Cool Joe and the Blonde Bomber? Here's three reasons that make Bradshaw's case as the best Super Bowl quarterback.


Come Super Bowl time, the "S" on Terry Bradshaw's sideline cap essentially stood for Superman.

The same could be said for former 49ers quarterback Joe Montana, who matched Bradshaw's record of 4-0 in Super Bowl competition a decade after Bradshaw's final Super Bowl win with the Steelers.

For whatever the reason, many Super Bowl "experts" dismiss Bradsahw's Super Bowl performances in favor of Montana's efforts in his Super Bowl triumphs. While Montana was certainly a standout performer on the game's biggest stage, one could make a very strong argument that Bradshaw is still the best Super Bowl quarterback ever.

Here's three reasons that argue Bradshaw's case:

1) Bradshaw faced tougher defenses: The Blonde Bomber faced and defeated Minnesota's famed Purple People Eaters in Super Bowl IX, the Steelers first of four Super Bowl victories in six years. He then defeated the Cowboys' downright scary Doomsday Defense twice, the first time in Super Bowl X and again three years later in Super Bowl XIII. A year after thrashing the Broncos to the tune of 35 passing yards and four interceptions in Super Bowl XII, Dallas was carved up by Bradshaw, who threw for a then-Super Bowl record 318 passing yards to go with four touchdown passes to win the game's MVP. In his final Super Bowl win, Bradshaw threw for 309 yards and two touchdowns against a Rams defense that had allowed just 19 points in its two playoff games prior to Super Bowl XIV.

While the Bengals' defenses of 1981 and '88 were tough, they were nothing like the defenses Bradshaw faced in his four Super Bowl wins. And the 1984 Dolphins defense that Montana carved up in Super Bowl XIX? They allowed 28 points two weeks earlier to a Steelers defense quarterbacked by the immortal Mark Malone. Finally, Montana's 297-yard, five touchdown performance in Super Bowl XXIV was against a dreadful Broncos defense that had allowed 39 and 42 points respectively in their previous two Super Bowls (Super Bowls XXI and XXII).

2) Montana had more help on offense: Bradshaw's running games were downright awful save a few plays in his final three Super Bowl wins. The Steelers averaged just 3.2 yards per carry in Super Bowl X, 2.8 yards a rush in Super Bowl XIII and a futile 2.3 yards a carry in Super Bowl XIV. The 49ers averaged 5.3 and 4.1 yards per rush against the Dolphins and Bengals in Super Bowls XIX and XXIII, and even though their average slipped to 3.3 yards in Super Bowl XXIV, Roger Craig and Tom Rathman combined to rush for a respectable 107 yards on 31 carries with three touchdowns in that game. Simply put, the opposing defenses took away Bradshaw's running games in three of his four Super Bowls. There was less help and more pressure on Bradshaw, especially late in the Super Bowl games, to deliver for his team, and each time, Bradshaw delivered.

1) Bradshaw dominated fourth quarters: Montana threw a total of 22 passes in the fourth quarter in his four Super Bowl victories. Take away his masterful 11-of-14, two touchdown fourth quarter performance in Super Bowl XXIII, Montana threw just six passes with zero touchdowns in the fourth quarter of Super Bowls, with just one pass having any significance in the game (a 22-yard completion in Super Bowl XVI led to the final three points in the 49ers 26-21 win over Cincinnati). Bradshaw, meanwhile, engineered eight fourth quarter scoring drives in Super Bowl competition that included four game-winning touchdown passes.

Pittsburgh trailed in Super Bowls X and XIV heading into the fourth quarter, in which Bradshaw led five total scoring drives in those games to secure Steelers victories. Bradshaw threw a 61-yard touchdown bomb to Lynn Swann to win Super Bowl X and a 73-yard scoring strike to John Stallworth to put Pittsburgh ahead to stay in Super Bowl XIV. Up 28-17 and looking for the knockout, Bradshaw found Swann for an 18-yard touchdown pass to secure the Steelers' win over Dallas in Super Bowl XIII.

To further strengthen Bradshaw's case is the fact that Montana enjoyed the comfort of Bill Walsh's West Coast Offense that was predicated on short, precise, high-percentage pass plays that resulted in Montana's longest Super Bowl pass being just 44 yards. Bradshaw, on the other hand, took his changes (and succeed) by throwing deep into the heart of the defenses in his final three Super Bowl wins. Bradshaw completed four passes that were caught 40 yards past the line of scrimmage in those games, which excludes Stallworth's 75-yard touchdown in the second quarter of Super Bowl XIII that was caught about 12 yards past the line of scrimmage.

While Montana was pure magic while directing the eight-play, 92-yard game-winning drive in Super Bowl XXIII that culminated in his 10-yard, game-winning touchdown pass to John Taylor with 34 seconds remaining, Bradshaw was (and needed to be) masterful in all four of his Super Bowl games in the fourth quarters, which is the most compelling reason why he still remains the best Super Bowl quarterback.

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until another QB wins more Super Bowls in 6 years Bradshaw is the best.

I'd take Tom Brady easily.  I wouldn't even have to think about it.

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Re: Three reasons why Bradshaw is still the greatest Super Bowl quarterback

Post by Admin on Thu Mar 05, 2015 5:50 pm

diehardsteersfan wrote:
fiboploc wrote:Terry Bradshaw went 4-0 in Super Bowls. Montana went 4-0 as well. While Brady gets props for winning four, two losses to the G-Men disqualifies the Pats passer. Who was better between Cool Joe and the Blonde Bomber? Here's three reasons that make Bradshaw's case as the best Super Bowl quarterback.


Come Super Bowl time, the "S" on Terry Bradshaw's sideline cap essentially stood for Superman.

The same could be said for former 49ers quarterback Joe Montana, who matched Bradshaw's record of 4-0 in Super Bowl competition a decade after Bradshaw's final Super Bowl win with the Steelers.

For whatever the reason, many Super Bowl "experts" dismiss Bradsahw's Super Bowl performances in favor of Montana's efforts in his Super Bowl triumphs. While Montana was certainly a standout performer on the game's biggest stage, one could make a very strong argument that Bradshaw is still the best Super Bowl quarterback ever.

Here's three reasons that argue Bradshaw's case:

1) Bradshaw faced tougher defenses: The Blonde Bomber faced and defeated Minnesota's famed Purple People Eaters in Super Bowl IX, the Steelers first of four Super Bowl victories in six years. He then defeated the Cowboys' downright scary Doomsday Defense twice, the first time in Super Bowl X and again three years later in Super Bowl XIII. A year after thrashing the Broncos to the tune of 35 passing yards and four interceptions in Super Bowl XII, Dallas was carved up by Bradshaw, who threw for a then-Super Bowl record 318 passing yards to go with four touchdown passes to win the game's MVP. In his final Super Bowl win, Bradshaw threw for 309 yards and two touchdowns against a Rams defense that had allowed just 19 points in its two playoff games prior to Super Bowl XIV.

While the Bengals' defenses of 1981 and '88 were tough, they were nothing like the defenses Bradshaw faced in his four Super Bowl wins. And the 1984 Dolphins defense that Montana carved up in Super Bowl XIX? They allowed 28 points two weeks earlier to a Steelers defense quarterbacked by the immortal Mark Malone. Finally, Montana's 297-yard, five touchdown performance in Super Bowl XXIV was against a dreadful Broncos defense that had allowed 39 and 42 points respectively in their previous two Super Bowls (Super Bowls XXI and XXII).

2) Montana had more help on offense: Bradshaw's running games were downright awful save a few plays in his final three Super Bowl wins. The Steelers averaged just 3.2 yards per carry in Super Bowl X, 2.8 yards a rush in Super Bowl XIII and a futile 2.3 yards a carry in Super Bowl XIV. The 49ers averaged 5.3 and 4.1 yards per rush against the Dolphins and Bengals in Super Bowls XIX and XXIII, and even though their average slipped to 3.3 yards in Super Bowl XXIV, Roger Craig and Tom Rathman combined to rush for a respectable 107 yards on 31 carries with three touchdowns in that game. Simply put, the opposing defenses took away Bradshaw's running games in three of his four Super Bowls. There was less help and more pressure on Bradshaw, especially late in the Super Bowl games, to deliver for his team, and each time, Bradshaw delivered.

1) Bradshaw dominated fourth quarters: Montana threw a total of 22 passes in the fourth quarter in his four Super Bowl victories. Take away his masterful 11-of-14, two touchdown fourth quarter performance in Super Bowl XXIII, Montana threw just six passes with zero touchdowns in the fourth quarter of Super Bowls, with just one pass having any significance in the game (a 22-yard completion in Super Bowl XVI led to the final three points in the 49ers 26-21 win over Cincinnati). Bradshaw, meanwhile, engineered eight fourth quarter scoring drives in Super Bowl competition that included four game-winning touchdown passes.

Pittsburgh trailed in Super Bowls X and XIV heading into the fourth quarter, in which Bradshaw led five total scoring drives in those games to secure Steelers victories. Bradshaw threw a 61-yard touchdown bomb to Lynn Swann to win Super Bowl X and a 73-yard scoring strike to John Stallworth to put Pittsburgh ahead to stay in Super Bowl XIV. Up 28-17 and looking for the knockout, Bradshaw found Swann for an 18-yard touchdown pass to secure the Steelers' win over Dallas in Super Bowl XIII.

To further strengthen Bradshaw's case is the fact that Montana enjoyed the comfort of Bill Walsh's West Coast Offense that was predicated on short, precise, high-percentage pass plays that resulted in Montana's longest Super Bowl pass being just 44 yards. Bradshaw, on the other hand, took his changes (and succeed) by throwing deep into the heart of the defenses in his final three Super Bowl wins. Bradshaw completed four passes that were caught 40 yards past the line of scrimmage in those games, which excludes Stallworth's 75-yard touchdown in the second quarter of Super Bowl XIII that was caught about 12 yards past the line of scrimmage.

While Montana was pure magic while directing the eight-play, 92-yard game-winning drive in Super Bowl XXIII that culminated in his 10-yard, game-winning touchdown pass to John Taylor with 34 seconds remaining, Bradshaw was (and needed to be) masterful in all four of his Super Bowl games in the fourth quarters, which is the most compelling reason why he still remains the best Super Bowl quarterback.

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until another QB wins more Super Bowls in 6 years Bradshaw is the best.

I'd take Tom Brady easily.  I wouldn't even have to think about it.
 Brady wouldn't be squat if he played in the era that Bradshaw or Montana did. Back then, teams were allowed to play defense.
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Re: Three reasons why Bradshaw is still the greatest Super Bowl quarterback

Post by diehardsteersfan on Thu Mar 05, 2015 7:31 pm

Admin wrote:
diehardsteersfan wrote:
fiboploc wrote:Terry Bradshaw went 4-0 in Super Bowls. Montana went 4-0 as well. While Brady gets props for winning four, two losses to the G-Men disqualifies the Pats passer. Who was better between Cool Joe and the Blonde Bomber? Here's three reasons that make Bradshaw's case as the best Super Bowl quarterback.


Come Super Bowl time, the "S" on Terry Bradshaw's sideline cap essentially stood for Superman.

The same could be said for former 49ers quarterback Joe Montana, who matched Bradshaw's record of 4-0 in Super Bowl competition a decade after Bradshaw's final Super Bowl win with the Steelers.

For whatever the reason, many Super Bowl "experts" dismiss Bradsahw's Super Bowl performances in favor of Montana's efforts in his Super Bowl triumphs. While Montana was certainly a standout performer on the game's biggest stage, one could make a very strong argument that Bradshaw is still the best Super Bowl quarterback ever.

Here's three reasons that argue Bradshaw's case:

1) Bradshaw faced tougher defenses: The Blonde Bomber faced and defeated Minnesota's famed Purple People Eaters in Super Bowl IX, the Steelers first of four Super Bowl victories in six years. He then defeated the Cowboys' downright scary Doomsday Defense twice, the first time in Super Bowl X and again three years later in Super Bowl XIII. A year after thrashing the Broncos to the tune of 35 passing yards and four interceptions in Super Bowl XII, Dallas was carved up by Bradshaw, who threw for a then-Super Bowl record 318 passing yards to go with four touchdown passes to win the game's MVP. In his final Super Bowl win, Bradshaw threw for 309 yards and two touchdowns against a Rams defense that had allowed just 19 points in its two playoff games prior to Super Bowl XIV.

While the Bengals' defenses of 1981 and '88 were tough, they were nothing like the defenses Bradshaw faced in his four Super Bowl wins. And the 1984 Dolphins defense that Montana carved up in Super Bowl XIX? They allowed 28 points two weeks earlier to a Steelers defense quarterbacked by the immortal Mark Malone. Finally, Montana's 297-yard, five touchdown performance in Super Bowl XXIV was against a dreadful Broncos defense that had allowed 39 and 42 points respectively in their previous two Super Bowls (Super Bowls XXI and XXII).

2) Montana had more help on offense: Bradshaw's running games were downright awful save a few plays in his final three Super Bowl wins. The Steelers averaged just 3.2 yards per carry in Super Bowl X, 2.8 yards a rush in Super Bowl XIII and a futile 2.3 yards a carry in Super Bowl XIV. The 49ers averaged 5.3 and 4.1 yards per rush against the Dolphins and Bengals in Super Bowls XIX and XXIII, and even though their average slipped to 3.3 yards in Super Bowl XXIV, Roger Craig and Tom Rathman combined to rush for a respectable 107 yards on 31 carries with three touchdowns in that game. Simply put, the opposing defenses took away Bradshaw's running games in three of his four Super Bowls. There was less help and more pressure on Bradshaw, especially late in the Super Bowl games, to deliver for his team, and each time, Bradshaw delivered.

1) Bradshaw dominated fourth quarters: Montana threw a total of 22 passes in the fourth quarter in his four Super Bowl victories. Take away his masterful 11-of-14, two touchdown fourth quarter performance in Super Bowl XXIII, Montana threw just six passes with zero touchdowns in the fourth quarter of Super Bowls, with just one pass having any significance in the game (a 22-yard completion in Super Bowl XVI led to the final three points in the 49ers 26-21 win over Cincinnati). Bradshaw, meanwhile, engineered eight fourth quarter scoring drives in Super Bowl competition that included four game-winning touchdown passes.

Pittsburgh trailed in Super Bowls X and XIV heading into the fourth quarter, in which Bradshaw led five total scoring drives in those games to secure Steelers victories. Bradshaw threw a 61-yard touchdown bomb to Lynn Swann to win Super Bowl X and a 73-yard scoring strike to John Stallworth to put Pittsburgh ahead to stay in Super Bowl XIV. Up 28-17 and looking for the knockout, Bradshaw found Swann for an 18-yard touchdown pass to secure the Steelers' win over Dallas in Super Bowl XIII.

To further strengthen Bradshaw's case is the fact that Montana enjoyed the comfort of Bill Walsh's West Coast Offense that was predicated on short, precise, high-percentage pass plays that resulted in Montana's longest Super Bowl pass being just 44 yards. Bradshaw, on the other hand, took his changes (and succeed) by throwing deep into the heart of the defenses in his final three Super Bowl wins. Bradshaw completed four passes that were caught 40 yards past the line of scrimmage in those games, which excludes Stallworth's 75-yard touchdown in the second quarter of Super Bowl XIII that was caught about 12 yards past the line of scrimmage.

While Montana was pure magic while directing the eight-play, 92-yard game-winning drive in Super Bowl XXIII that culminated in his 10-yard, game-winning touchdown pass to John Taylor with 34 seconds remaining, Bradshaw was (and needed to be) masterful in all four of his Super Bowl games in the fourth quarters, which is the most compelling reason why he still remains the best Super Bowl quarterback.

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until another QB wins more Super Bowls in 6 years Bradshaw is the best.

I'd take Tom Brady easily.  I wouldn't even have to think about it.
 Brady wouldn't be squat if he played in the era that Bradshaw or Montana did. Back then, teams were allowed to play defense.

I disagree.  Brady is one of the smartest quarterbacks.  I never bought into the nostalgia that fans and writers did.  Today's corners are bigger, faster and more talented than in yesteryear.  The game has changed but corners still get away with the contact most of the time except maybe during the preseason and the beginning of the regular season last year.  Bradshaw had a world class team that he played with- that gave him an advantage that most NFL quarterbacks could only dream of playing with.

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Re: Three reasons why Bradshaw is still the greatest Super Bowl quarterback

Post by Guest on Thu Mar 05, 2015 9:12 pm

fiboploc wrote:Terry Bradshaw went 4-0 in Super Bowls. Montana went 4-0 as well. While Brady gets props for winning four, two losses to the G-Men disqualifies the Pats passer. Who was better between Cool Joe and the Blonde Bomber? Here's three reasons that make Bradshaw's case as the best Super Bowl quarterback.


Come Super Bowl time, the "S" on Terry Bradshaw's sideline cap essentially stood for Superman.

The same could be said for former 49ers quarterback Joe Montana, who matched Bradshaw's record of 4-0 in Super Bowl competition a decade after Bradshaw's final Super Bowl win with the Steelers.

For whatever the reason, many Super Bowl "experts" dismiss Bradsahw's Super Bowl performances in favor of Montana's efforts in his Super Bowl triumphs. While Montana was certainly a standout performer on the game's biggest stage, one could make a very strong argument that Bradshaw is still the best Super Bowl quarterback ever.

Here's three reasons that argue Bradshaw's case:

1) Bradshaw faced tougher defenses: The Blonde Bomber faced and defeated Minnesota's famed Purple People Eaters in Super Bowl IX, the Steelers first of four Super Bowl victories in six years. He then defeated the Cowboys' downright scary Doomsday Defense twice, the first time in Super Bowl X and again three years later in Super Bowl XIII. A year after thrashing the Broncos to the tune of 35 passing yards and four interceptions in Super Bowl XII, Dallas was carved up by Bradshaw, who threw for a then-Super Bowl record 318 passing yards to go with four touchdown passes to win the game's MVP. In his final Super Bowl win, Bradshaw threw for 309 yards and two touchdowns against a Rams defense that had allowed just 19 points in its two playoff games prior to Super Bowl XIV.

While the Bengals' defenses of 1981 and '88 were tough, they were nothing like the defenses Bradshaw faced in his four Super Bowl wins. And the 1984 Dolphins defense that Montana carved up in Super Bowl XIX? They allowed 28 points two weeks earlier to a Steelers defense quarterbacked by the immortal Mark Malone. Finally, Montana's 297-yard, five touchdown performance in Super Bowl XXIV was against a dreadful Broncos defense that had allowed 39 and 42 points respectively in their previous two Super Bowls (Super Bowls XXI and XXII).

2) Montana had more help on offense: Bradshaw's running games were downright awful save a few plays in his final three Super Bowl wins. The Steelers averaged just 3.2 yards per carry in Super Bowl X, 2.8 yards a rush in Super Bowl XIII and a futile 2.3 yards a carry in Super Bowl XIV. The 49ers averaged 5.3 and 4.1 yards per rush against the Dolphins and Bengals in Super Bowls XIX and XXIII, and even though their average slipped to 3.3 yards in Super Bowl XXIV, Roger Craig and Tom Rathman combined to rush for a respectable 107 yards on 31 carries with three touchdowns in that game. Simply put, the opposing defenses took away Bradshaw's running games in three of his four Super Bowls. There was less help and more pressure on Bradshaw, especially late in the Super Bowl games, to deliver for his team, and each time, Bradshaw delivered.

1) Bradshaw dominated fourth quarters: Montana threw a total of 22 passes in the fourth quarter in his four Super Bowl victories. Take away his masterful 11-of-14, two touchdown fourth quarter performance in Super Bowl XXIII, Montana threw just six passes with zero touchdowns in the fourth quarter of Super Bowls, with just one pass having any significance in the game (a 22-yard completion in Super Bowl XVI led to the final three points in the 49ers 26-21 win over Cincinnati). Bradshaw, meanwhile, engineered eight fourth quarter scoring drives in Super Bowl competition that included four game-winning touchdown passes.

Pittsburgh trailed in Super Bowls X and XIV heading into the fourth quarter, in which Bradshaw led five total scoring drives in those games to secure Steelers victories. Bradshaw threw a 61-yard touchdown bomb to Lynn Swann to win Super Bowl X and a 73-yard scoring strike to John Stallworth to put Pittsburgh ahead to stay in Super Bowl XIV. Up 28-17 and looking for the knockout, Bradshaw found Swann for an 18-yard touchdown pass to secure the Steelers' win over Dallas in Super Bowl XIII.

To further strengthen Bradshaw's case is the fact that Montana enjoyed the comfort of Bill Walsh's West Coast Offense that was predicated on short, precise, high-percentage pass plays that resulted in Montana's longest Super Bowl pass being just 44 yards. Bradshaw, on the other hand, took his changes (and succeed) by throwing deep into the heart of the defenses in his final three Super Bowl wins. Bradshaw completed four passes that were caught 40 yards past the line of scrimmage in those games, which excludes Stallworth's 75-yard touchdown in the second quarter of Super Bowl XIII that was caught about 12 yards past the line of scrimmage.

While Montana was pure magic while directing the eight-play, 92-yard game-winning drive in Super Bowl XXIII that culminated in his 10-yard, game-winning touchdown pass to John Taylor with 34 seconds remaining, Bradshaw was (and needed to be) masterful in all four of his Super Bowl games in the fourth quarters, which is the most compelling reason why he still remains the best Super Bowl quarterback.

http://www.behindthesteelcurtain.com/pittsburgh-steelers-opinions-reactions-news-updates/2015/2/4/7972499/terry-bradshaw-steelers-super-bowl-tom-brady-patriots


until another QB wins more Super Bowls in 6 years Bradshaw is the best.
Pretty good article.. Bradshaw was a big game QB.. His play in the big game reminds me of Mr. October, Reggie Jackson..

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Re: Three reasons why Bradshaw is still the greatest Super Bowl quarterback

Post by guppy on Sat Mar 07, 2015 3:31 pm

Steely wrote:


Terry Bradshaw went 4-0 in Super Bowls. Montana went 4-0 as well. While Brady gets props for winning four, two losses to the G-Men disqualifies the Pats passer.


Pretty good article.. Bradshaw was a big game QB.. His play in the big game reminds me of Mr. October, Reggie Jackson.. 



The statement in the article's first sentence, "two losses to the G-Men disqualifies the Pats passer" actually disqualifies the rest of the article imo.   The two Pats losses to the G-Men (where the fault could be laid at the feet of the Pats defense, not Brady who gave his team the lead late in both games) means he won two more Conference Championships than Montana or Bradshaw.  Obviously all three have won the same number of SB wins.  But Brady winning two more Lamar Hunt trophies than Terry or Joe is no small deal.  When Montana went to the Chiefs for his last two years (and had Marcus Allen as his running back), they made the playoffs, but lost both times short of making to the Superbowl.  Joe failed make it to the superbowl those times, so he didn't even have an opportunity to lose it.  Personally, I think it is more impressive to go 6 times and be 4-2, than go "only" 4 times and be 4-0.  To say that winning an AFC Championship and making it to the Superbowl basically means nothing because you go on to lose the SB, as the author implies, is just foolish logic. 

The rest of the article is OK.  But in giving his opinion, I think the author failed to consider three basic facts that separates Brady somewhat from Bradshaw and Montana: 1) Unlike the other two, Brady plays in the salary cap and free agency era, and won his 4 SBs with completely different casts around him.  He certainly did not throw balls to the likes of Hall of Famers Lynn Swann, John Stallworth or Jerry Rice; 2) Brady holds just about every career post season record there is for a quarterback - wins, yards, TDs, etc.; and 3) finally and most importantly, Tom aint done yet.

Finally, consider that Brady just faced a Seattle defense that was the best in the league for the last three years running, considered one of the best ever, and just one year ago, absolutely destroyed and embarrassed the great Peyton Manning and held his Broncos to a mere 7 points.  Brady against that same Seahawk defense?  Over 350 yards passing and 4 TDs to 4 different receivers while flawlessly engineering the greatest 4th Q comeback in SB history.  How about the author giving some credit for that?   

Nothing against all time greats and Hall of Famers Bradshaw and Montana.  But when the author just dismisses Brady out of hand in his comparison with those two, and his only reason for doing so is Brady's two superbowl losses to the Giants, and then you couple that with the fact that Brady is the No. 1 most accomplished post season QB in history, I just can't buy any of the rest of what the article is selling.
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Re: Three reasons why Bradshaw is still the greatest Super Bowl quarterback

Post by foghorn on Sat Mar 07, 2015 5:35 pm

guppy wrote:
Steely wrote:


Terry Bradshaw went 4-0 in Super Bowls. Montana went 4-0 as well. While Brady gets props for winning four, two losses to the G-Men disqualifies the Pats passer.


Pretty good article.. Bradshaw was a big game QB.. His play in the big game reminds me of Mr. October, Reggie Jackson.. 



The statement in the article's first sentence, "two losses to the G-Men disqualifies the Pats passer" actually disqualifies the rest of the article imo.   The two Pats losses to the G-Men (where the fault could be laid at the feet of the Pats defense, not Brady who gave his team the lead late in both games) means he won two more Conference Championships than Montana or Bradshaw.  Obviously all three have won the same number of SB wins.  But Brady winning two more Lamar Hunt trophies than Terry or Joe is no small deal.  When Montana went to the Chiefs for his last two years (and had Marcus Allen as his running back), they made the playoffs, but lost both times short of making to the Superbowl.  Joe failed make it to the superbowl those times, so he didn't even have an opportunity to lose it.  Personally, I think it is more impressive to go 6 times and be 4-2, than go "only" 4 times and be 4-0.  To say that winning an AFC Championship and making it to the Superbowl basically means nothing because you go on to lose the SB, as the author implies, is just foolish logic. 

The rest of the article is OK.  But in giving his opinion, I think the author failed to consider three basic facts that separates Brady somewhat from Bradshaw and Montana: 1) Unlike the other two, Brady plays in the salary cap and free agency era, and won his 4 SBs with completely different casts around him.  He certainly did not throw balls to the likes of Hall of Famers Lynn Swann, John Stallworth or Jerry Rice; 2) Brady holds just about every career post season record there is for a quarterback - wins, yards, TDs, etc.; and 3) finally and most importantly, Tom aint done yet.

Finally, consider that Brady just faced a Seattle defense that was the best in the league for the last three years running, considered one of the best ever, and just one year ago, absolutely destroyed and embarrassed the great Peyton Manning and held his Broncos to a mere 7 points.  Brady against that same Seahawk defense?  Over 350 yards passing and 4 TDs to 4 different receivers while flawlessly engineering the greatest 4th Q comeback in SB history.  How about the author giving some credit for that?   

Nothing against all time greats and Hall of Famers Bradshaw and Montana.  But when the author just dismisses Brady out of hand in his comparison with those two, and his only reason for doing so is Brady's two superbowl losses to the Giants, and then you couple that with the fact that Brady is the No. 1 most accomplished post season QB in history, I just can't buy any of the rest of what the article is selling.
1st off..... for months you haven't been on this board....then, one mention of Brady and you come flying in. The question I have for you Gup.... is how many times a day do you jerk off looking at your Brady doll? Secondly, a Steeler fan, discussing something on the Steeler board, gave a positive comment towards Tommy... that flew right by you. you instead chose to Dive into a perceived debate about your precious QB. Fact is.... MOST NFL fans do not hold Cheatin' Tommy in as high a reguard as you do.  I don't mean to "deflate" your hero, but untill you have established a relationship  with Steeler folks here.... just STFU and let us talk.... what we say about you lil sweetheart boy is not relevant to you on this board. Go back to the Pats board.... keep jerkin your gerkin saying "Tommy is so great!".
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Re: Three reasons why Bradshaw is still the greatest Super Bowl quarterback

Post by Guest on Sat Mar 07, 2015 10:35 pm

foghorn wrote:1st off..... for months you haven't been on this board....then, one mention of Brady and you come flying in. The question I have for you Gup.... is how many times a day do you jerk off looking at your Brady doll? Secondly, a Steeler fan, discussing something on the Steeler board, gave a positive comment towards Tommy... that flew right by you. you instead chose to Dive into a perceived debate about your precious QB. Fact is.... MOST NFL fans do not hold Cheatin' Tommy in as high a reguard as you do.  I don't mean to "deflate" your hero, but untill you have established a relationship  with Steeler folks here.... just STFU and let us talk.... what we say about you lil sweetheart boy is not relevant to you on this board. Go back to the Pats board.... keep jerkin your gerkin saying "Tommy is so great!".

LMAO

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Re: Three reasons why Bradshaw is still the greatest Super Bowl quarterback

Post by Admin on Sat Mar 07, 2015 11:15 pm

Steely wrote:
foghorn wrote:1st off..... for months you haven't been on this board....then, one mention of Brady and you come flying in. The question I have for you Gup.... is how many times a day do you jerk off looking at your Brady doll? Secondly, a Steeler fan, discussing something on the Steeler board, gave a positive comment towards Tommy... that flew right by you. you instead chose to Dive into a perceived debate about your precious QB. Fact is.... MOST NFL fans do not hold Cheatin' Tommy in as high a reguard as you do.  I don't mean to "deflate" your hero, but untill you have established a relationship  with Steeler folks here.... just STFU and let us talk.... what we say about you lil sweetheart boy is not relevant to you on this board. Go back to the Pats board.... keep jerkin your gerkin saying "Tommy is so great!".

LMAO
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Re: Three reasons why Bradshaw is still the greatest Super Bowl quarterback

Post by guppy on Sun Mar 08, 2015 10:19 pm

Steely wrote:
foghorn wrote:1st off..... for months you haven't been on this board....

So?

then, one mention of Brady and you come flying in.

f]]So?[/b]

The question I have for you Gup.... is how many times a day do you jerk off looking at your Brady doll? Secondly, a Steeler fan, discussing something on the Steeler board, gave a positive comment towards Tommy... that flew right by you.

Wrong.

you instead chose to Dive into a perceived debate about your precious QB. Fact is.... MOST NFL fans do not hold Cheatin' Tommy in as high a reguard as you do.

What's "reguard"?

  I don't mean to "deflate" your hero, but untill you have established a relationship  with Steeler folks here.... just STFU and let us talk

f]]Why?[/b]

.... what we say about you lil sweetheart boy is not relevant to you on this board.

Why not?

Go back to the Pats board.... keep jerkin your gerkin saying "Tommy is so great!".

Sportsgasms are the some of the best gasms.

LMAO

LMAO.
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Re: Three reasons why Bradshaw is still the greatest Super Bowl quarterback

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